Lift Heavy-Duty Shop Productivity with These 7 Steps

Keeping trucks, buses and other work vehicles on the road where they belong is the number one priority of any fleet maintenance operation.

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Rotary Lift at The 2014 Mid-American Trucking Show
Rotary Lift at The 2014 Mid-American Trucking Show

Fleet managers can help maximize vehicle uptime by choosing shop equipment that improves technician productivity and efficiency. For example, the right vehicle lifts can drastically reduce the time needed to complete both routine maintenance and repair tasks. Lifts that are properly matched to the vehicle and service being performed can also improve technician ergonomics, decreasing the risk of injury and improving employee recruitment and retention.

A wide range of vehicle lifts are available for heavy-duty repair shops: mobile column lifts, inground lifts, two-post lifts, four-post lifts, parallelogram lifts, vertical rise lifts, scissor lifts and more. How do you know which lift is right for your operation? The following 7 steps will get you started. Download Rotary Lift’s free Heavy Duty Resource Guide or talk to your local factory-authorized dealer to learn more.

A wide range of vehicle lifts are available for heavy-duty repair shops: mobile column lifts, inground lifts, two-post lifts, four-post lifts, parallelogram lifts, vertical rise lifts, scissor lifts and more.

  1. Evaluate your facility layout. Factors such as available space, traffic flow, soil/concrete quality, vehicle length and turning radius, and facility ownership will affect the style and quantity of lifts you consider.
  2. Consider the vehicles to be serviced. The sizes of vehicles you work on will dictate which lift styles, lifting capacities and accessories you will need. There is no one-size-fits-all heavy-duty lift.
  3. Review the services your shop performs now and could perform in the future. Could your technicians do more inspections in a shift with a lift? Are you currently sending out heavy repair jobs that you could keep in-house if you had the right lift?
  4. Compare productivity features. Any lift will go up and down, but some lifts are designed with user-friendly features to help technicians get more done in less time. Look at how easy the lift is to set up, how long vehicle spotting takes, and how intuitive the lift controls are. How quickly can the vehicle be lifted to full height and brought back down? Can the lift you’re considering pick up every vehicle in your fleet?
  5. Find out where the lift is manufactured. Is the lift you’re considering made in America? Does it meet domestic engineering and safety standards? Where will replacement parts come from, and how quickly?
  6. Make sure the lift is gold label certified. The gold ALI certification label on a lift is your only assurance that it has been third-party tested and certified to meet ANSI safety and performance standards.
  7. Talk to your peers. Find out what other fleets like yours use in their own shops. Why be a guinea pig? Look for a lift with a proven history of performance and factory-trained support.

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